Tiger Uppercut

iguanamouth:

youre gonna look so godamn cool

imnuralanguage:

Let’s talk about plurals. In Imnura, plurals are created by changing all the vowels in a word - just like English does with “goose/geese” or “foot/feet.” Unlike English, Imnura plurals are all very regular. It’s easy to figure out how to change the vowels in a word to make it plural: using AEIOU,…

Imnura plurals.

imnuralanguage:

An Imnura color wheel! Many colors are named after natural things. Note that all these words are hom (identifiers: nouns/verbs). To create nathed (descriptors: adjectives/adverbs), add -o (after a consonant) or -no (after a vowel).
baori - little red; also applies to pink
sumunoram - complex blossom; also, Vappodes phalaenopsis, the Cooktown Orchid
uroli - also, lime
gosad - one who warns; also, Cyanocorax caeruleus, the azure blue jay
ionihm - blueish; green is considered a shade of blue
adar - also, lake
deligor - also, vine

imnuralanguage:

An Imnura color wheel! Many colors are named after natural things. Note that all these words are hom (identifiers: nouns/verbs). To create nathed (descriptors: adjectives/adverbs), add -o (after a consonant) or -no (after a vowel).

  • baori - little red; also applies to pink
  • sumunoram - complex blossom; also, Vappodes phalaenopsis, the Cooktown Orchid
  • uroli - also, lime
  • gosad - one who warns; also, Cyanocorax caeruleus, the azure blue jay
  • ionihm - blueish; green is considered a shade of blue
  • adar - also, lake
  • deligor - also, vine
Fasle Dichotomy

Fasle Dichotomy

There’s kind of a double standard.

There’s kind of a double standard.

imnuralanguage:

An illustrated Imnura conversation! I constructed this to demonstrate a few things:How to greet a stranger and introduce yourself, one way to respond to introductions, a new word: “butterfly” (hisanar), how to answer in the affirmative, plurals, and words with two meanings.
aikunos. bil o oraya na.(Hello. My name is Bill.)miliniurel, bil. ana o oraya na.(Nice to meet you, Bill. My name is Ana.)

hisanarpalio thëd o na ikoëza?(Do you want to visit the butterfly house?)thëd. noraya.(I’d like to. Thank you.)
ëlizano hosener na.(The butterflies are beautiful.)o na fët.(I agree.)
më ë naro thëd o nao sëral.(Another date with you would make me happy.)fa o.(Me, too.)
When Bill asks Ana, “hisanarpalio thëd o na ikoëza,” she replies, “thëd.” Imnura doesn’t have a yes-no system - that means there are no single words for “yes” or “no.” Instead, it uses echo responses to answer questions which, in English, could be answered with those two words. Ana repeats the verb in Bill’s question (thëd) to indicate an affirmative answer. If she had not wanted to go to the butterfly house, she would have said “aks thëd,” using the negating particle “aks” in conjunction with the repeated verb to indicate the negative.
Speaking of “thëd,” you’ll see here that it has two meanings: “see” or “a seen thing” and “date” or “a date.” When (using “thëd”) Bill asks Ana to the butterfly house, she knows he isn’t asking if she would like to date the butterfly house, even though his question could be interpreted that way. And, when (using “thëd” again) he tells her that he wants another date with her, she knows that he isn’t saying that he wants to see her in exactly the same way they saw the butterflies. Considering the word order alone, Ana might get confused, as “thëd” comes before the word “I” and a helping verb in both sentences in which it appears. She knows mostly from context that “thëd” means “date” in the second instance and “to see” in the first one.
Have questions? Please don’t hesitate to ask!

imnuralanguage:

An illustrated Imnura conversation! I constructed this to demonstrate a few things:
How to greet a stranger and introduce yourself, one way to respond to introductions, a new word: “butterfly” (hisanar), how to answer in the affirmative, plurals, and words with two meanings.

aikunos. bil o oraya na.
(Hello. My name is Bill.)
miliniurel, bil. ana o oraya na.
(Nice to meet you, Bill. My name is Ana.)

hisanarpalio thëd o na ikoëza?
(Do you want to visit the butterfly house?)
thëd. noraya.
(I’d like to. Thank you.)

ëlizano hosener na.
(The butterflies are beautiful.)
o na fët.
(I agree.)

më ë naro thëd o nao sëral.
(Another date with you would make me happy.)
fa o.
(Me, too.)

When Bill asks Ana, “hisanarpalio thëd o na ikoëza,” she replies, “thëd.” Imnura doesn’t have a yes-no system - that means there are no single words for “yes” or “no.” Instead, it uses echo responses to answer questions which, in English, could be answered with those two words. Ana repeats the verb in Bill’s question (thëd) to indicate an affirmative answer. If she had not wanted to go to the butterfly house, she would have said “aks thëd,” using the negating particle “aks” in conjunction with the repeated verb to indicate the negative.

Speaking of “thëd,” you’ll see here that it has two meanings: “see” or “a seen thing” and “date” or “a date.” When (using “thëd”) Bill asks Ana to the butterfly house, she knows he isn’t asking if she would like to date the butterfly house, even though his question could be interpreted that way. And, when (using “thëd” again) he tells her that he wants another date with her, she knows that he isn’t saying that he wants to see her in exactly the same way they saw the butterflies. Considering the word order alone, Ana might get confused, as “thëd” comes before the word “I” and a helping verb in both sentences in which it appears. She knows mostly from context that “thëd” means “date” in the second instance and “to see” in the first one.

Have questions? Please don’t hesitate to ask!

imnuralanguage:

Today I wanted to talk about vowels. Imnura has 8 unique symbols for vowel sounds: A, E, I, O, U, Ë, ËA, and, ËO. All other vowel sounds are written as combinations of two symbols. All vowels are short. These 8 vowel sounds are pronounced like this:A = /ɑ/ as in “far”E = /ɛ/ as in “ever”I = /i/ as in “see”O = /o/ as in “boring”U = /u/ as in the Spanish “tu”Ë = /ɛi/ as in “way”ËA = /ɛiɑ/as in “crayon”ËO = /ɛio/ as in “Crayola”The Imnura writing system is not technically an alphabet. It’s an abugida: instead of all the letters being written in a line, the vowels are written as diacritics above or below the consonants. Most vowels can also be stacked above each other to create diphthongs. The only vowel symbols that don’t stack are E and Ë. With the exception of its two triphthongs, ËA and ËO, Imnura doesn’t allow combinations of more than two vowels. When these occur, they are separated by a semivowel - either Y or W. “Oai” (pronounced “why”) is not a proper word. It would have to be written “oayi” or “owai” (depending on which diphthong you wanted to split with a hiatus). ËA and ËO are exceptions because they are written with their own symbols. “Ëayia” is a proper construction (though it isn’t a word). Such combinations are, as yet, unheard of, but not impossible. Imnura also doesn’t allow double vowels. When transliterating non-Imnura names with double vowels, like Aaron or Brooke, a single vowel should be used. (“Aaron” would be written “Eron,” and “Brooke” would be written “Bruk.” There is no way to make the OO sound of “Brooke” in Imnura. Sorry, Brookes of the world.)When standing on their own, vowels must be carried by vowel stems. Stemmed vowels may also appear in compound words like “koëyowan” (“how one comports one’s self”), which contains a diphthong - “OË” - that cannot be made by stacking vowels. the picture above contains examples of how to write vowels, starting with “koëyowan.” The vowels are in red. Remember that Imnura goes left to right, just like English.

imnuralanguage:

Today I wanted to talk about vowels. Imnura has 8 unique symbols for vowel sounds: A, E, I, O, U, Ë, ËA, and, ËO. All other vowel sounds are written as combinations of two symbols. All vowels are short. These 8 vowel sounds are pronounced like this:
A = /ɑ/ as in “far”
E = /ɛ/ as in “ever”
I = /i/ as in “see”
O = /o/ as in “boring”
U = /u/ as in the Spanish “tu”
Ë = /ɛi/ as in “way”
ËA = /ɛiɑ/as in “crayon”
ËO = /ɛio/ as in “Crayola”
The Imnura writing system is not technically an alphabet. It’s an abugida: instead of all the letters being written in a line, the vowels are written as diacritics above or below the consonants. Most vowels can also be stacked above each other to create diphthongs. The only vowel symbols that don’t stack are E and Ë. 
With the exception of its two triphthongs, ËA and ËO, Imnura doesn’t allow combinations of more than two vowels. When these occur, they are separated by a semivowel - either Y or W. “Oai” (pronounced “why”) is not a proper word. It would have to be written “oayi” or “owai” (depending on which diphthong you wanted to split with a hiatus). ËA and ËO are exceptions because they are written with their own symbols. “Ëayia” is a proper construction (though it isn’t a word). Such combinations are, as yet, unheard of, but not impossible. Imnura also doesn’t allow double vowels. When transliterating non-Imnura names with double vowels, like Aaron or Brooke, a single vowel should be used. (“Aaron” would be written “Eron,” and “Brooke” would be written “Bruk.” There is no way to make the OO sound of “Brooke” in Imnura. Sorry, Brookes of the world.)
When standing on their own, vowels must be carried by vowel stems. Stemmed vowels may also appear in compound words like “koëyowan” (“how one comports one’s self”), which contains a diphthong - “OË” - that cannot be made by stacking vowels. the picture above contains examples of how to write vowels, starting with “koëyowan.” The vowels are in red. Remember that Imnura goes left to right, just like English.

hentai-ass:

folie-a-dookie:

notyourspecies:

Sexism on tumblr. I know your hearts are in the right place but still, this is bad.

this is powerful

HAHAHAHAH

Why is this funny again?

Continuing with my DBZ theme, here’s one of my favorite Vegeta monologues translated into Imnura. As an added (and possibly hilarious) bonus, I present to you my VO as Imnura Vegeta - who sounds quite a bit tlhIngan.

aksiozirav gal biliro siyina nel! gur hadora o na. këthan o latha o nab iori! tesj athi zema o na. ezbar o otora o ner ithorath. fiar muwar nodoyad o nab angasj jta? ësulo biliro sëyen aks nao haorat. ibo ji o aksdaliso o na. ibo fero puheth o nior amno fa fero taga o nior tai. o nab tai. ji pono sëyen thëgera sanastada soruksath nab sipë, fa biliro o nab na. olira kanë kagarot, këdag brëa o rayana ë lo ikoa ë o nab thëd.

The Super Saiyans of legend were an invincible warrior race! I am their son. And at long last, I have risen to claim my birthright. I have stepped into the ranks of greatness. All my life, I have worked toward this goal and for what? To be brushed aside as easily as a common housefly by an android? A true Super Saiyan would not have fallen. Maybe I am not who I think I am. Perhaps there are still new plateaus for me to reach, far greater heights to which I must ascend. Yes, I will ascend. The universe will marvel to see the ultimate Saiyan potential realized once again, and I will be legendary. And then Kakarot, then I will see you bow before your Prince.